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St Albans attractions team up to offer visitors a money-saving deal

St Albans attractions team up to offer visitors a money-saving deal

Joint tickets are now on sale for two of St Albans’ most important Roman venues – saving visitors cash, St Albans City and District Council has announced.

One ticket will get people into both the Verulamium Museum and the nearby Roman Theatre at the Gorhambury Estate.

The sites began trialling the initiative last month and it has now been officially launched as the school holidays get underway.

Tickets can be bought at either venue and are valid for up to a year, allowing people to stagger their visits.

They are available for adults, children, family groups and concessions.

A joint family ticket – two adults, two children – costs £16 compared to the previous £20 cost of buying separate tickets for the two venues.

Councillor Annie Brewster, Portfolio Holder for Sport, Leisure and Heritage for St Albans City and District Council, said: “The joint ticketing initiative is an exciting new development. It will encourage people to visit both sites by cutting the cost of doing so. Visitors will get a fantastic insight into one of the most significant Roman settlements in Britain.

“The two Roman sites show off the rich history of St Albans and the joint ticket deal will promote them both.”

Verulamium was the third largest Roman city in Britain and the museum, off St Michaels Street, contains a host of exhibits that bring it back to life.

During August, there will be a number of fun holiday activities available for the family including Roman face mask making.

Children will also be able to make Roman-themed key rings, badges and fridge magnets as well as create moving gladiator pictures. There is an Archaeology Apprentices event on Sunday 16 August, featuring a simulated dig for relics, for children aged five plus.

The Roman theatre, off Bluehouse Hill by the main entrance to Gorhambury, is the only one of its kind in Britain. It features a stage for performances, rather than the more common amphitheatre.

 
by Philip Kenchington, allaboutstalbans.com - 10/08/2015 00:00

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